Being a parent means that instituting change and leading the way to help put a stop to social injustices and systemic racism starts at home. Make a conscious choice to be part of the solution and consciously widen the lens that children look through. You can start by having conversations with them--conversations that might be difficult. Thankfully, there are some wonderful children's books available that help teach little ones about equality, kindness and inclusivity. We have pulled together a selection of book recommendations that drive home these essential values.

Dockatot books

Lovely by Jess Hong
This adorable book supports the idea that it is our differences that make us lovely. It celebrates diversity and challenges the standard definition of beauty. The illustrations are simply that--lovely.

Same, Same, But Different by Jenny Sue Kostecki-Shaw
This best-selling children's book portrays the friendship between two pen pals--one who lives in America and the other in India. They discover that even though their parts of the world may look very different, the have a lot more in common than they thought.

The Colors of Us by Karen Katz
From beloved children's author Karen Katz, this book was inspired by her own  daughter, who she adopted from Guatemala. The vivid illustrations help champion diversity as guided by a child's curiosity and a mother's love. 

Dockatot books social change

Dream Big Little One by Vashti Harrison 
This inspiring book features 18 prominent and amazing women in black history. The black female leaders on these pages made momentous marks on the world and will spark younger generations to stand up for what they believe in.

A is for Awesome by Eva Chen
Written by Instagram darling Eva Chen, this delightfully illustrated book features feminist icons who changed the world. Leaders in training will love to read more about Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Tina Turner, Amelia Earhart and more. 

A Kids Book About Racism by Jelani Memory 
Sometimes it's important to just get straight to the point. Author Jelani Memory, a father of six, helps define what racism really is, how it makes others feel and how to spot it. 

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